iPhone

iPhone I'll not be ill

Thanks to this post it is much easier to enter contractions on the iPhone. The automatic correction features work well but don't guess that I mean to type "I'll" when it sees the perfectly spelled word "ill" which one hopes to rarely type on an iPhone. However, adding a third 'l' makes the phone suggest "I'll" as the correct spelling so instead of switching to the symbols just type "illl" and you'll get "I'll" offered as the correction.

iPhone impressions

So it is the thing to do these days. Posting one's impressions of the iPhone.

Oddly in explaining why he is not getting one now Adam Engst sums up much of my joy over the phone:

The cost becomes especially steep here in upstate New York, where cell service is fairly spotty. I'm sure the iPhone would get fine reception in downtown Ithaca and at Cornell, but all bets are off once you go more than a few miles out of town. Poor reception promotes a feedback cycle - if you can't rely on having access wherever you are, you stop thinking about using the cell phone unless it's absolutely necessary.

iPhone diagnostic information

My iPhone crashed. Or so it says. I never noticed the problem and couldn't tell you when it happened. But upon plugging it in to the computer tonight I saw the screen below.
iPhone error message

While it appears true that there is not personal information in the log files there is a treasure trove of information that I'm equally certain that there will soon be folks figuring out how to mine and use that information. In the meantime it is another great example of a good user interface that makes it easy to provide feedback that will hopefully make iPhone 2.0 even better.

On a related note since Apple names its computer operating systems after big cats one wonders if the next version of the iPhone operating system will be Siamese or Manx. Personally I vote for Abyssinian.

iLine

Greetings from the iLine Las Vegas version. We'll soon see what the iPhone is like.

iPhone Sillyness

iPhone applications would be dangerous. At least that it the position of Apple's CEO Steve Jobs when he told Newsweek:

“You don’t want your phone to be an open platform,” meaning that anyone can write applications for it and potentially gum up the provider's network, says Jobs. “You need it to work when you need it to work. Cingular doesn’t want to see their West Coast network go down because some application messed up.”

This could easily have been in competition for silliest statement of the year had Jim Gibbons not already won the award.

On the other hand, maybe it is a sign that everybody should drop Cingular. Their network is already in use by Treo Smart phones, Windows Mobile phones, and PC cards plugged directly into laptops. All of these devices run applications written by third party developers not by Cingular or Apple, yet the network survives. Come on Steve end the Apple Developer Lockout.

iPhone Abstinence

Merlin Mann: "Let OS X developers at the iPhone.

I could not agree more. I'm of a mind that somebody with some time should setup iPhoneAbstinence.com or iPhoneDeveloperLockout.com and publish a list of would-be customers for Apple to see just how many of us who are excited and ready to buy an iPhone are waiting until it can do the one thing our smart phones can do that it can't - work with third party applications.

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