Colorado

Home again Colorado

Crossing the Rockies, descending along the Front Range into Denver International Airport at sunset brought back so many great memories. Each time I make that descent and come upon Fort Collins, Loveland, Boulder and the other towns tucked up against the foothills it is hard not to imagine returning in a more permanent way.

[video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPOvcSlnLyg]

There are so many beautiful places in the world but here, where the mountainous backbone of the continent meets the great plains is a very special place. And of course walking out to see the Colorado State University banner didn't hurt either. Combine the great city, a good dinner and getting to video chat with the wife and daughter and things look pretty good. Onward to Chicago.

Going home

Last weekend we took a trip to Colorado. It was the first time I'd been back since we packed up the house and moved to my native Nevada over three years ago. Colorado is one addicting place. Walking along the Platte River and remembering what an REI flagship store is like were great reminders.

LAS...DEN....IND

An early morning travel day today. McCarran in the early mornings is one of the best places to be flying from. It doesn't hurt that I'm out at the newest gates, the D-Gates, which are easily the nicest at the airport. Today also brings an layover in Denver. It seems I haven't been back to Denver International Airport since March of 2004 when I went through on the way back from a friend's wedding. Oh how time flies when life is busy.Today's mile-high stop is just a stop over on the way to Inidanapolis en-route to Bloomington, Indiana for a meeting. As always the free WiFi network is great. I used the EvDo last night for the town meeting in Sandy Valley and it was good but the wireless here is great. Of course without it I'd still not know about my breakfast choice but it could have been considerably worse.

Questions raised about CU Foundation

Cindy Carlisle, University of Colorado regent, has a very frank editorial in the Colorado Daily about CU Foundation President Michael Byram. The editorial is a must-read for every Colorado resident who has a direct interest in how $9 million are spent each year. Carlisle cites her two-year quest for some documents which seem as though they should be readily accessible to all Coloradans.

Public interest or pocketbook protection

The Rocky Mountain News puts forth its arguments for voting against Amendment 36. The proposed amendment in Colorado would make Colorado's election of electors proportional instead of the more common winner-take-all plan of 48 states. Their first argument is that it would reduce Colorado's influence in selecting a president. However they don't disclose their interest in keeping it. The true interest has less to do with what is best for the people of Colorado. The argument is that a candidate won't spend time in a state with a 4-5 difference in electors compared to a state with winner-take-all and 9 electors. What is more to the point for the Rocky Mountain News is that their ad revenue will decrease if the "interest" of the candidates decreases.

Here a huge media company portrays the interest of Colorado voters as it's main point. However it fails to mention that for decades media companies of all sizes have depended on the revenue from elections to provide great profits.

Public interest or pocketbook protection

The Rocky Mountain News puts forth its arguments for voting against Amendment 36. The proposed amendment in Colorado would make Colorado's election of electors proportional instead of the more common winner-take-all plan of 48 states. Their first argument is that it would reduce Colorado's influence in selecting a president. However they don't disclose their interest in keeping it. The true interest has less to do with what is best for the people of Colorado. The argument is that a candidate won't spend time in a state with a 4-5 difference in electors compared to a state with winner-take-all and 9 electors. What is more to the point for the Rocky Mountain News is that their ad revenue will decrease if the "interest" of the candidates decreases.

Here a huge media company portrays the interest of Colorado voters as it's main point. However it fails to mention that for decades media companies of all sizes have depended on the revenue from elections to provide great profits.

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